Outrun the Wind by Elizabeth Tammi- Review

Outrun the Wind by Elizabeth Tammi feature photo

Synopsis

Outrun the Wind reviewThe Huntresses of Artemis must obey two rules: never disobey the goddess, and never fall in love. After being rescued from a harrowing life as an Oracle of Delphi, Kahina is glad to be a part of the Hunt; living among a group of female warriors gives her a chance to reclaim her strength, even while her prophetic powers linger. But when a routine mission goes awry, Kahina breaks the first rule in order to save the legendary huntress Atalanta.

To earn back Artemis’s favor, Kahina must complete a dangerous task in the kingdom of Arkadia— where the king’s daughter is revealed to be none other than Atalanta. Still reeling from her disastrous quest and her father’s insistence on marriage, Atalanta isn’t sure what to make of Kahina. As her connection to Atalanta deepens, Kahina finds herself in danger of breaking Artemis’ second rule.

She helps Atalanta devise a dangerous game to avoid marriage, and word spreads throughout Greece, attracting suitors willing to tempt fate to go up against Atalanta in a race for her hand. But when the men responsible for both the girls’ dark pasts arrive, the game turns deadly.

Review

You may have heard  the story of Greek heroine Atalanta, but you’ve never heard her story quite like this. Outrun the Wind by Elizabeth Tammi is a retelling of the Atalanta myth, the story of the only girl on the hunt for the massive Calydonian Boar.

Atalanta is known for her speed and hunting prowess. However, when the Calydonian boar is coming after her, she isn’t the one who kills it. But being the only woman in a group of men who don’t particularly like having her on board, Atalanta takes credit for the kill and pockets the weapon that did it. Athena and her huntresses are upset that the boar has been killed. But Athena is more angry that one of her huntresses, Kahina, is the one that threw the knife. When the leader of the Calydonian hunt is killed, Atalanta strikes off on her own. Kahina is exiled from Athena’s huntresses and forced to complete a task in Arkadia to earn her place back among them.

Kahina can’t get Atalanta out of her mind. She didn’t believe she’d ever again see the girl who took credit for her kill and whom she blames for her exile. Soon they run into each other in Arkadia. There, both girls must get over their frustrations with one another to protect themselves against people who’d hurt them in their pasts, and to protect them both against the looming threat of Athena’s brother, Apollo.

characters

One thing that I really enjoyed about this book was the relationships and conflict between characters. Atalanta and Kahina are both strong, capable, badass women whose perspectives were fun to read. Their experiences and backstories are well written and the characters pasts influence their actions within the story itself. While Kahina’s chip on her shoulder in regards to Atalanta (blaming Atalanta for her exile) was irritating, I enjoyed the enemies to friends trope that played out in regards to their relationship. However, I did struggle to connect to these characters for a good portion of the book. Even when I was reading their perspective, they felt kind of closed off. I didn’t connect with either Atalanta or Kahina until about halfway through the book.

Even the secondary characters were fun to read about. Phelix, the cinnamon roll, was easily my favorite character in the story. Even though he wasn’t one of the point of view characters, the author did a really good job in helping the reader connect with and feel for him.  I really enjoyed his relationship to both Atalanta and Kahina, and reading about their adventures as a trio was fun.

setting

The settings in this book were vivid, and the author described them so well that they were easy to picture while reading. The palace of Arkadia was especially vivid and well-written. The people there, and the struggles of the court, allowed you to have an idea of the inner politics, while the description of the land and the city below painted a beautiful picture.

Overall

For me, this book was unique because of it’s perspective on the Greek myth of Atalanta. We were able to see both sides of the story and get into the minds of both of our heroines. I can’t say much more without giving too much away, but if you’re a fan of the Percy Jackson series, mythology retellings, and well developed female characters, I highly recommend you read Outrun the Wind!

Rating: 3.75/5 stars!

The publisher sent me this book in exchange for an honest review.